Neuroscience Resources for University Students

There are a number of more advanced neuroscience resources targeted at a more advanced level.  Included below are a small selection of these that include open access content, tutorials, experiments and simulations, and guides for science communication.

 

  • Allen Brain Atlas

The Allen Brain Atlas is an online resource that integrates gene expression and neuroanatomical data.

http://www.brain-map.org/

 

  • Cognition Laboratory Experiments

The Cognition Laboratory Experiments website from Hanover College includes a selection of online experiments designed to test cognitive processes.

http://psych.hanover.edu/JavaTest/CLE/Cognition/Cognition.html

 

  • Health Sciences Writing

Science writing is an important aspect of research.  Luckily there are several useful online resources including a guide published by the University of Toronto that covers different science communication formats (http://hswriting.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/hswriting/issue/view/207) and a writing guide for students in the life sciences from Harvard (http://writingproject.fas.harvard.edu/files/hwp/files/life_sciences.pdf).  If your research makes use of animal models then please check the National Academies Press publication, “Guidance for the Description of Animal Research in Scientific Publications” for helpful information (https://www.nap.edu/catalog/13241/guidance-for-the-description-of-animal-research-in-scientific-publications).

 

  • Reviewing Scientific Publications

As you progress in your neuroscience career, you may be asked to review scientific manuscripts for publication.  The peer review process is critical to publishing and providing clear and constructive comments in your review is vital.  For some guidelines on how to approach peer review, please check Elsevier’s Reviewer portal (https://www.elsevier.com/reviewers) and Reviewer’s Update pages (https://www.elsevier.com/connect/reviewers-update) for tips, commentaries, guidelines and the latest information on manuscript review.  Sense about Science has also published a basic guide to peer review (http://senseaboutscience.org/activities/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts/) that is free for download.

 

  • The InnerBody

This online resource allows you to interactively explore anatomy in two and three dimensions.  The website includes a section on the nervous system with pictures and brief background information on the different brain structures.

http://www.innerbody.com/image/nervov.html

 

  • MIT OCW

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Open Courseware website provides access open access to course material for MIT undergraduate and graduate level courses.  There is material available for 2340 courses, including a large number of courses that are related to neuroscience.

https://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

 

  • Lundbeck Institute Campus

The Lundbeck Institute Campus website provides a library of slides related to neuroscience that can be downloaded and used in presentations.

http://institute.progress.im/en/content/slide-library

 

  • Neuronline

Neuronline is a collection of career resources from the Society of Neuroscience.  It provides information related to professional development, scientific research, and career paths and advice.  Membership of the Society for Neuroscience is needed in order to access some of the materials.

http://neuronline.sfn.org/

 

  • Neuro Tutorials

This website from Hanover College provides online tutorials and guidelines for experiments relating to basic neural functions.

http://psych.hanover.edu/Krantz/neurotut.html

 

  • SNNAP

The Simulator for Neural Networks and Action Potentials (SNNAP) is a programme from the University of Texas that allows students to carry out simulated experiments related to nerve signalling.  The website provides downloads of the software as well as tutorials.

https://med.uth.edu/nba/resources/snnap/

 

  • The Whole Brain Atlas

If you have an interest in neuroanatomy or neuroimaging, then the Whole Brain Atlas is an incredible resource that contains images of both the healthy brain and brains affected by specific diseases.

http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/home.html

 

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